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Sean Kelly Artists in Venice

Rebecca Horn

The Milk of Dreams
The 59th International Art Exhibition La Biennale di Venezia
Curated by Cecilia Alemani,
Located in the Arsenale

The Kiss of Rhinoceros

Rebecca Horn conceived the now iconic sculpture the Kiss of Rhinoceros in 1989 specifically for groundbreaking exhibition Les Magiciens de la Terre curated at the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, in Paris. This sculpture exemplifies Horn’s oeuvre and symbolic world inhabited with objects, often mechanized, that are liberated from their defined materiality and transposed into ever-changing metaphors touching on mythical, historical, literary and spiritual imagery. Rebecca Horn is recognized for a pioneering body of work spanning over 50 years that is distinguished by its precise physical and technical functionality and conceptual complexity. Her oeuvre encompasses sculpture, installation, drawing, film, performance, and poetry. This is the artist’s third participation in the Venice Biennale.

Rebecca Horn
Kiss of the Rhinoceros, 1989
Steel construction, aluminum, motors, electric devices
Dimensions: 153 1/2 x 212 1/2 x 19 3/16 inches (390 x 540 x 60 cm)
Photography: Rebecca Horn Workshop © Rebecca Horn VG Bild Kunst

Rebecca Horn
Kiss of the Rhinoceros, 1989
Steel construction, aluminum, motors, electric devices
Dimensions: 153 1/2 x 212 1/2 x 19 3/16 inches (390 x 540 x 60 cm)
Photography: Rebecca Horn Workshop © Rebecca Horn VG Bild Kunst

Rebecca Horn’s work has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions at the Bank Austria Kunstforum Wien, Vienna, Austria (2021); the Museum Tinguely, Basel, Switzerland (2019); the Centre Pompidou-Metz, Paris, France (2019); Tate Modern, London, UK; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Stedelijk Van Abbesmuseum, Eindhoven, The Netherlands; the Lehmbruck Museum, Duisburg, Germany; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan; the Museé du Louvre, Paris, France; and The Multimedia Art Museum Moscow, Moscow, Russia amongst others. She is included in major public collections worldwide including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art, Turin; the Tate Gallery, London; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco; the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; and the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia. She has participated in the Sydney Biennale (2008), the 47th (1997) and 42nd (1986) Venice Biennales, and Documenta IX (1992). She has been the recipent of numerous awards including the Premium Imperiale Prize, Japan (2010) for sculpture.

To learn more about the history of this artwork please click here
For inquiries please email Cécile Panzieri

Marina Abramović

This is Ukraine: Defending Freedom
Scuola Grande della Misericordia, Sestiere Cannaregio
Organizing Institutions: the PinchukArtCentre, the office of the President of Ukraine, and the Ministry of Culture; Supported by the Victor Pinchuk Foundation and Curated by Björn Geldhof

Marina Abramović, Count on Us, 2003, single room installation consisting of 4 channel projections and a monitor, dimensions variable. Installation view: Marina Abramović retrospective exhibition, The Cleaner, Museum of Contemporary Art, Ušće, September 21, 2019 - January 20, 2020.

 

 

 

Marina Abramović, Count on Us (Star) [1 screen projection], 2003, 1 screen projection, dimensions variable.

Marina Abramović, Count on Us (Star) [1 screen projection], 2003, 1 screen projection, dimensions variable.

Count on Us, 2003, is a multi-channel installation comprised of four video channels: 'Star', 'Boy', 'Girl', and 'Chorus.' Originally created as an emotional response to the Balkan War, Abramović's message applies to the current war in the Ukraine, as well as future wars happening anytime or anywhere.

The film ‘Chorus’ shows a children’s choir, dressed solemnly in black, singing the hymn of the United Nations in Serbo-Croatian, which is conducted by a skeleton, mounted on the back of the artist in a black costume.  When Abramović returned to Belgrade after the war, she found a music school with a professor who composed himself the song about the United Nations, glorifying their help. However, for Abramović, the song is a metaphor for something that really didn't happen. According to the artist, “the food sent to help was from old storages, with expired medications and expired canned foods. It created more damage than help. The chorus conducted by the skeleton is an ironic response.”

The projection is flanked to the left and right by 'Boy,' which shows a boy in front of a bright red curtain singing a poetic folk song about love, and 'Girl,' which instead features a young girl singing about loss and longing. Projected on the floor, 'Star' depicts an aerial view of Abramović, lying on the ground wearing black clothes, her arms and legs splayed, with a skeleton lying on top of her. Children surround the skeleton in a star formation on the ground - symbolizing a communist star, but instead of red, it is black.  Visually arresting and powerfully moving, this work is still relevant today.

Photography: ©Marco Anelli, 2021. Courtesy of Marina Abramović Archives

 

Photography: ©Marco Anelli, 2021. Courtesy of Marina Abramović Archives

 

"With this piece I hoped to say
Yes, we had a war
Yes, we are in economic disaster
Yes, the country is in ruins
Still there are children
They are our energy and they are our hope"

Marina Abramović was born in 1946 in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. Since the beginning of her career in the early 1970s when she attended the Academy of Fine Arts in Belgrade, Abramović has pioneered the use of performance as a visual art form. The body has been both her subject and medium. Exploring the physical and mental limits of her being, she has withstood pain, exhaustion and danger in the quest for emotional and spiritual transformation.

This will be Abramović's third time exhibiting work in the Venice Biennale (previously in 1976 and 1997). She was awarded the Golden Lion for Best Artist at the 1997 Venice Biennale for her extraordinary video installation and performance piece Balkan Baroque.

For inquiries please email Lauren Kelly

Julian Charrière

Uncombed, Unforeseen, Unconstrained
Conservatorio di Musica Benedetto Marcello, San Marco 2810
Organizing institution: Parasol Unit Foundation for Contemporary Art and curated by Ziba Ardalan





 

Julian Charrière, And Beneath It All Flows Liquid Fire, 2019, 4k color film, aspect ratio 16:9, stereo sound, continuous loop, Edition of 5 with 2 APs 

 

Julian Charrière, And Beneath It All Flows Liquid Fire, 2019, 4k color film, aspect ratio 16:9, stereo sound, continuous loop, Edition of 5 with 2 APs 

And Beneath It All Flows Liquid Fire 

Suggesting multiple ways in which his 2019 film can be interpreted, Charrière notes that beneath the political debates, philosophical reflections and symbolic meanings associated with various phenomena of the environmental system, there lies the original and autonomous state of the planet, free from all human interpretation. Deep beneath the Earth's surface, between its outer-most crust and inner core, magma—the molten or semi-molten natural material from which all igneous rocks are formed—constantly churns. Even in the most frozen regions of the earth, this "liquid fire" constantly flows.

In this film, Charrière’s fountain depicts an absurd state that implies the coexistence of opposite elements, water and fire. The artist turns the traditional iconography of the fountain on its head in symbolic terms too: the connection with water and the concept of a spring of life now dominated by flames. Fire has an ambiguous meaning, for it is not just an element of destruction but is also considered humankind’s oldest conquest, corresponding to the beginning of civilization.

Installation image by Julian Charrière, Uncombed, Unforeseen, Unconstrained, Conservatorio di Musica Benedetto Marcello, Organizwed by the Parasol Unit Foundation for Contemporary Art and curated by Ziba Ardalan. April 2022. 

Installation image by Julian Charrière, Uncombed, Unforeseen, Unconstrained, Conservatorio di Musica Benedetto Marcello, Organizwed by the Parasol Unit Foundation for Contemporary Art and curated by Ziba Ardalan. April 2022. 

Installation view: Not All Who Wander Are Lost, MASI Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland, 2019, Image by Jens Ziehe.

Installation view: Not All Who Wander Are Lost, MASI Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland, 2019, Image by Jens Ziehe.

Not All Who Wander Are Lost

Glacial "erratics" are stones, ranging in size from small pebbles to enormous boulders. They continue to have a mysterious and highly evocative power even though modern science has revealed how these stones were carried to their present location by glaciers moving across the landscape, depositing them as the ice melted. Julian Charrière reflects in this work on the movement of matter and further human intervention.

Removed from their natural sites and moved with means of transport typically used in quarries, the erratic rocks are perforated multiple times by core-drilling. This process of extraction not only symbolizes the human consumption of natural resources, it recognizes the scientific method of collecting historic geological data. With this core drilling technique, samples taken from glaciers provide information on the evolution of the Earth's climate from the current age back over millennia.

Charrière's core samples, however, are associated with the time of human history and human intervention. At points where the core samples were broken during extraction, sections of precious and semi-precious metals are inserted, which are typically mined. The more the drilling advances, the lighter the boulder becomes physically, seemingly moving over a bed of core-drilled stone arranged like in ancient transportation methods, continuing the original glacier journey. However, the core-drilling procedure is one of progressive deletion and an apt metaphor for our current ecological crisis: if this process of human intervention progresses too far, the boulder will crumble beyond a point of no return.

For inquiries please email Lauren Kelly

David Claerbout

Uncombed, Unforeseen, Unconstrained
Conservatorio di Musica Benedetto Marcello, San Marco 2810
Organizing institution: Parasol Unit Foundation for Contemporary Art  and curated by Ziba Ardalan

David Claerbout, Wildfire (Meditation on Fire), 2019-2020, single channel video projection, 3D animation, stereo audio, color, 24 min, Installation: Musea Brugge, St John's Hospital, Bruges, 2020 (photo Dominique Provost)

David Claerbout, Wildfire (Meditation on Fire), 2019-2020, single channel video projection, 3D animation, stereo audio, color, 24 min, Installation: Musea Brugge, St John's Hospital, Bruges, 2020 (photo Dominique Provost)

Wildfire (Meditation on Fire)

Biological programming, still existent in today’s living creatures dictates a reflex to stay away from fire if it cannot be contained (i.e. a wildfire). A ‘meditation on fire’ may therefore sound like an impossibility. These works are all about the wonder of images. How can so little do so much? 

Inspired by the inquiry into the amount of power needed to produce a digital “still life” of fire, this work confronts the biological and the digital. Long shots of silenced fire appropriate the notion of a biological breathing time, while the abstract nature of the burning fire becomes a reference to technological abstraction, suggesting the increasingly abstract world in which we live.

In Wildfire (Meditation of Fire), the camera has been removed and disintegrated into a numerical system of binary codes. We are confronted with the illusion of an image, a hallucination, a visual construct of computing. These images create an immersive experience of the impossible.

"I want people to be able to touch this image and this light with their eyes in complete tranquillity. I want them to take in this scene with serenity, but also to appreciate these trees transformed into torches as permanent things, even though in graphic terms, everything seems to inform us that nothing will ever be the same again." - David Claerbout

For inquiries, please email Janine Cirincione

Antony Gormley

Lucio Fontana / Antony Gormley
Negozio Olivetti, Piazza San Marco 101
Organizing institution: Associazione Arte Continua and curated by Luca Massimo Barbero

Antony Gormley, Model Model 2, 2022 3 mm Corten steel, 19.7 x 51.5 x 122.5 cm, © the artist

Antony Gormley, Model Model 2, 2022 3 mm Corten steel, 19.7 x 51.5 x 122.5 cm, © the artist

Antony Gormley, BRACE III, 2018, Carbon and casein on paper, 55.7 x 38.5cm © the artist

Antony Gormley, BRACE III, 2018, Carbon and casein on paper, 55.7 x 38.5cm © the artist

Two masters of sculpture, Lucio Fontana and Antony Gormley, are brought together for the first time through a presentation of graphic works, works on paper and sculpture. The exhibition will take shape inside an extraordinary space: the Negozio Olivetti, property of Generali Assicurazioni and entrusted to the care and management of FAI, an architectural jewel completed in 1958 and nestled in the porticoes of Piazza San Marco in Venice and designed by Carlo Scarpa.

The exhibition has been conceived and curated by Luca Massimo Barbero, one of the world’s leading scholars of Lucio Fontana, as well as a scientific consultant to the Foundation dedicated to the artist.  The exhibition is built around a concise association of space and light to be found in the work of both sculptors. It will develop across a selection of drawings made by Fontana between 1946 and 1968 and a series of drawings, workbooks and models that run through all aspects of Antony Gormley's research, together with the presence of sculptures by both of the artists.

Antony Gormley, CHROMOSPHERE XI, 2019, Carbon and casein on paper, 27.7 x 38cm, © the artist

Antony Gormley, CHROMOSPHERE XI, 2019, Carbon and casein on paper, 27.7 x 38cm, © the artist

Lucio Fontana"I make holes; infinity passes through, light passes, there is no need to paint … everyone thought that I wanted to destroy: but that’s not true, I’ve created, not destroyed."

Antony Gormley"Lucia Fontana spent a lifetime revealing the fact that space exists behind appearance and inviting us to experience it. I am thrilled to have this opportunity to have a dialogue with him through objects and drawings in which body and space are continually seen as equivalent mediums of apprehension."

Luca Massimo Barbero"Fontana and Gormley’s work with sculpture goes beyond time. In Lucio Fontana’s works, space becomes a timeless and ahistorical place. Sign and body interact intimately in the conceptual path that supports Antony Gormley's research and that leads to the total rupture of the boundaries imposed between inside and outside, space and time." 

For inquiries, please contact Cécile Panzieri

Kehinde Wiley

Kehinde Wiley: An Archaeology of Silence
Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Isola di San Giorgio Maggiore
Organizing institution: Musée d'Orsay
Curated by Christophe Leribault

Front: “The Virgin Martyr Cecilia” (2022), bronze, 251 × 152 3/4 × 70 1/8 inches. Back: “Young Tarentine II (Ndeye Fatou Mbaye)” (2022), oil on canvas, 131 7/8 × 300 inches

Front: “The Virgin Martyr Cecilia” (2022), bronze, 251 × 152 3/4 × 70 1/8 inches. Back: “Young Tarentine II (Ndeye Fatou Mbaye)” (2022), oil on canvas, 131 7/8 × 300 inches

For this new body of work, Kehinde Wiley sheds light on the brutalities of American and global colonial pasts using the language of the fallen hero. Kehinde Wiley: An Archaeology of Silence will include a collection of new monumental paintings and sculptures, expanding on Wiley's body of work, DOWN, from 2008. Initially inspired by Hans Holbein’s painting The Dead Christ in the Tomb as well as historical paintings and sculptures of fallen warriors and figures in a state of repose, Wiley created an unsettling series of prone Black bodies, re-conceptualizing classical pictorial forms to create a contemporary version of monumental portraiture, resounding with violence, pain, and death, as well as ecstasy.

Wiley expands on these core thematic elements to meditate on the deaths of young Black men slain all over the world. Technology allows viewers to witness these graphic depictions of violence against the Black body that were once silenced. Wiley states, “That is the archaeology I am unearthing: The spectre of police violence and state control over the bodies of young Black and Brown people all over the world.” In light of the current global conflicts, language concerning power struggles and inalienable human rights are more critical than ever.

Kehinde Wiley, Sleep (Jean-Bernard Restout), 2022, Oil on canvas, 302 x 206 cm © Kehinde Wiley

Kehinde Wiley, Sleep (Jean-Bernard Restout), 2022, Oil on canvas, 302 x 206 cm © Kehinde Wiley

Detail of “Morpheus” (2022), bronze, 26 3/4 × 59 × 29 1/2 inches

Detail of “Morpheus” (2022), bronze, 26 3/4 × 59 × 29 1/2 inches

The new portraits depict young Black men and women in positions of vulnerability and tells a story of survival and resilience, revealing the beauty that can emerge from the horrific. These poses, borrowed from Western European art historical sources, function as beautiful elegies echoing a central metaphor of youth and resilience and stand as monuments to endurance and perseverance in the face of savagery, incorporating a scale that pushes beyond the mere corporeal and into the realm of spiritual icons, of martyrs and saints.

The exhibition is curated by Christophe Leribault, President of the Musée d’Orsay and Musée de l’Orangerie, who organized Kehinde Wiley: Lamentation, Wiley’s first exhibition in France at the Petit Palais in 2016. As an art historian specializing in 19th century, Leribault has a deep connection to the art historical underpinnings of Wiley’s work.

For inquiries, please email Janine Cirincione

Kehinde Wiley, The Wounded Achilles, 2022, Oil on canvas, 274.2 X 177.7 cm, © Kehinde Wiley

Kehinde Wiley, The Wounded Achilles, 2022, Oil on canvas, 274.2 X 177.7 cm, © Kehinde Wiley